CYD

Article: 100 Life Hacks You Need To Read To Start Your 2016 Right

100 Life Hacks You Need To Read To Start Your 2016 Right

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/quora/100-life-hacks-you-need-t_b_8939902.html

Getting Things Done – A Primer

GTD is an organizational system. It doesn’t put rules around how you actually do your work. Instead, it focuses on how you capture the work you need to do, organize it, and choose what needs your attention. At its core, GTD stands on five “pillars,” or steps to getting and staying organized:

Learn more about the basics of David Allen’s Getting Things Done from this Lifehacker artice on GTD.

Jim McCullen / controlyouday.net

 

 

5 Things you Should Not do in 2016 to be more productive

stop doing what doesn't work

The new year is a great time for a fresh start. Give thought to the systems and processes you apply to get things done at work and home. Here are 5 things you should stop doing to make 2016 a more successful and productive year.

  1. Reduce the noise from incoming email
    Turn off the automatic send and receive feature on your email and the pop-up alerts that tell you when new email has arrived.
    Turn off email alerts on your phone, do you really need to be alerted every time some one decides to interact with you?
  2. Stop checking your email every 5 minutes
    This one is hard, I struggle with it at times, check your email at pre-determined times each day and then focus your attention on the work you have already committed to instead of constantly looking for something new and quick to work on.
  3. Don’t let others take over your day
    Do you really need to answer every phone call, instantly react to each email or engage in long conversations with no real outcome. Before you start that dialog (electronic or face to face), give thought to what you could have accomplished in that time. I agree at times you need to engage and help others,  but at the same time, you need to prioritize your time to deliver on your own commitments.
  4. Stop sitting at your desk for extended periods of the day
    Taking breaks throughout the day will increase your productivity, get up, walk around take a few minutes to clear your brain and do a bit of a reset. One tip, don’t grab your phone and spend that time checking Facebook.
  5. Eliminate distractions by cleaning up the clutter
    This is a definitely problem for me, my desk at home is cluttered with things I need to do. When I am working on a difficult project or task it is too easy to just look around and find something simpler, faster and more fun to do. Block out some time to organize the clutter into projects or next actions, document those in your system of choice (email, todo list, etc..) and then get them off your desk.

If you are a Microsoft Outlook user, stop by ControlYourDay.net to check out a better way to manage email and tasks in Outlook using the best practices of Getting Things Done (David Allen).

Happy New Year !
Jim McCullen

 

Control Your Day – Top GTD Productivity Book

14bestproductivitybooks

Best selling author S.J. Scott included my book Control Your Day in his list of top GTD productivity books. Fantastic to see my name up there with some of the top books on the subject.

Stop by his site to check out the complete list and to check out his content on forming great habits. He has some great free content on his site including a free audio book and ebook.

Take Back Control of your Inbox

I wrote this as a guest post for Joy Healey over at www.joyhealey.com. Joy blogs about internet marketing, blogging, ebooks and other topics, she also posts reviews on books of interest.

Take Back Control of Your Inbox

What does your email inbox look like today? When I say inbox I am really talking about all of your collection buckets. A collection bucket is any place or device or software that you use to keep track of all of the things you need to get done: like projects, tasks, errands, bills, etc.

You might have a box on your desk at work, or maybe just a section of your desk where you pile papers you need to get back to. What about at home? Do you have a place where you keep bills to be paid, receipts to be filed, things you need to do for your kids, pets or other family members? Do you have multiple email accounts? How do you keep it all organized?

In this article, my goal is to share some proven techniques with you that will help you reduce your stress levels and the time you spend managing your systems.

The concepts I am going to cover are all based on the bestselling book “Getting Things Done” by David Allen. David is a productivity guru, if you have not read or heard about his book you should check the link above, after you are finished reading, and pick up a copy.

Collection Buckets

You need to develop a trusted system and reduce the number of collection buckets you have. If you are a paper person, it is fine to have a collection box for work and for home, but make sure everything gets into that box and that you work through each box at least once a week (Weekly Review). The Weekly review is critical to the success of your system, if you don’t perform this step, then your collection box will quickly get out of control and out of date.

You can do the same thing with your email. You can use your email software to manage all of the inbound and outbound messages and insure that you stay in control.

A few years back, I developed a system (Control Your Day) that uses Microsoft Outlook and the concepts of Getting Things Done to allow you to take back control of your Email Inbox. You can get more information about how to set up the system at ControlYourDay.net.

Thanks to spam, and to the fact that we are leading multi-faceted lives these days, most people have a number of email addresses they use for different purposes.

ControlYourDay

In my case I have an email address for each book I publish, a personal address, an email list address and a number of others all on Gmail. Instead of checking each mailbox individually, I set up the auto-forward feature for each account and auto-forward all of my email addresses to my primary personal address.

My personal address is set up in Microsoft Outlook so that I can manage all of my messages in Outlook. I can still see who sent me the original message and I can reply from any of the email addresses I have setup. You can see I have multiple collection points but they all funnel into one system, one final collection box that I can then manage.

Next Actions

This is another “Getting Things Done” concept from David Allen. I have a great story that clearly highlights the value of setting next actions.

Last summer, one of my drain pipes broke on my garage. Every night when I came home from work, I would see that broken drain pipe and think to myself “I need to fix that” which created a bit of stress for me. On the weekend I would be out running errands and I would remember that I needed to fix the drain pipe but then I would realize I didn’t know what parts I needed to complete the job.

This is where Next Actions come into play. What was my first Next Action for this project? I needed to figure out the parts that I needed for the job. I took a few minutes and measured everything out and wrote down a list of parts. That completed my first deliverable for this project, a bit of relief.

My next action was to get that list on to my errands list. During my next visit to the home improvement store, I was able to pick up all of the parts that I needed.

My next action was to block out some time to get the project done. The weekend came and I had all of the parts and an action plan. I was able to fix the drain and get onto another project.

You can apply these same concepts to your email. When you read an email you may not have time to work on it immediately. Can you set a next action and put that information in a comments field or at the top of the message?

This way when you come back to that message you don’t have to read through it again to figure out what the next action is; you already have that written down.

Take that one step further and define a context for your next action.

Context Lists

In my drain pipe example, I talked about my errands list. This is an example of a Context List.

How many times have you gone to a store, walked around with a thought in the back of your head that you needed something but you couldn’t remember what it was? Then you get back home, try to turn on your lamp and realize you needed light bulbs. You can build context lists for errands, phone calls, things to do when you are at the office, at home, etc. Then you can use these lists to work productively within that context.

If your collection boxes (in-boxes) are out of control, they are creating stress for you, causing you to miss deadlines or fail to deliver on commitments you’ve made. If you can take back control, you will put yourself in a position of power and take just a little bit of stress out of your life.

If you think these concepts would help you take back control, pick up a copy of “Getting Things Done“.

If you are a Microsoft Outlook user, then you should add “Control Your Day” to your reading list.

Please add your questions, thoughts and comments below, and you can reach Jim at Jim@ControlYourDay.net

10 Tips to Manage your Time and Get Things Done

I came across a great post today by Martin Webster. This is a great post to print out and post on your wall right next to your monitor. I need great reminders like this to reset myself every once in a while, especially when my workload gets overloaded.

http://www.leadershipthoughts.com/10-tips-for-managing-your-time-effectively-and-getting-things-done/#comment-138113

Phishing Scam could give others access to your Gmail account

hack

Latest Gmail phishing scam. A hacker that knows your email address and cell phone # goes to Gmail and requests an SMS password reset. They then send you an email from an address that looks like it is coming from Google or a text and say your account is at risk, they just sent you a code, please reply back with that code so we can protect your account. The hacker now has the code and can login to your email account. They can then take it over or worse add themselves as an auto-foward and watch everything you do. Here is a link to an article with more details on this scam.

https://grahamcluley.com/2015/06/hack-email-account-mobile/

Stop using Filler Words, especially in presentations

fillerwords

Before I start on this subject, I need to tell you a story. I was in the middle of a global training session in Hong Kong with about 25 people in the room along with a few of my associates. About 10 minutes into the meeting I glanced over at one of my mates and noticed he was chuckling with one of my other team members. I finished up my presentation and when the group left for a break I walked over to find out what was so funny. They had two words in front of them and each had a count of at least 20. The words were “actually” and basically”. I asked what was going on, they told me they had been counting the number of times I said each of those words in the presentation. definitely a bit shocking and I can assure you my next presentation had a lot more pauses and a lot less of those two words.

 

Here are some popular filler words that add no value to what you are saying:

  • actually, ah, basically, like, hopefully , I know right
  • just, quickly, sorry, um, yea right, you know

 

The next time you attend a sales pitch or a presentation, listen for these filler words and how often they are used. When you listen to someone that does not use these filler words, how much better do they come across than someone who uses one of these words or phrases to convey each thought or concept?

 

Think about those poor folks in my presentation, they were from China, Japan, Korea, Taiwan. English was a second language for all of them and I was making them convert useless words in their head so they could listen along to my presentation.

 

The next time you give a presentation or sales pitch or are just involved in an in depth conversation give thought to how many times each of these words or phrases come out of your mouth. If you really want to challenge yourself, you can ask someone in the room to track the number of filler words you use, if you are not ready for that, try recording the session on your smart phone and then go back later and listen to what you said.

 

Well basically that is all I have to say, actually if it didn’t meet your expectations i am sorry, hopefully it did.

Jim McCullen
www.ControlYourDay.net

 

 

 

 

 

Control Your Email – Clean out your Inbox

Have you lost control of your email? Tasks and to-do items slipping through the cracks? Forgotten commitments coming back to bite you? Trying to get to Inbox Zero?

Control Your Day (CYD) is an email management system I designed (using Microsoft Outlook) based on the GTD concepts presented by David Allen in his best selling book Getting Things Done. CYD does not require any special plugins or additional software, just a standard copy of Microsoft Outlook.

The concept is to bring all of your tasks, to-do items, commitments and emails into one view in Outlook using only email messages. We shut down your inbox and instead setup a virtual search folder that shows you messages in order based on your priority and includes messages you have both sent and received. From there you can break messages down into segments or contexts so you can focus on the right work at the right time.

The Control Your Day book first explains the system and then provides a step by step guide to help you get your new system setup and running. There are thousands of people across the planet using CYD today. CYD was first introduced years ago to the GTD community through Tara Robinson and the GTD Virtual Study Group. Thanks to the global reach of Amazon.com, CYD is in use by thousands of people across the globe.

You will find everything you need on the site to get started with CYD.

Wishing you a happy, healthy, prosperous 2015.

Jim McCullen – jim@controlyourday.net
www.controlyourday.net

 

 

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